Members of faculty rock band ‘The Profs’ talk music and their origin as band

One band, one name, six professors.
“My favorite concert was probably in 2011,” Jett said.

“The crowd was really into it. We played a Profs rendition of Miley Cyrus’s ‘Party in the U.S.A.’,” Dr. Crane said.

By Alena Blakley, Chief Photographer

One band, one name, six professors.

In 2007, six professors on Oklahoma Baptist University’s campus got together and formed a rock band called The Profs.

Every other year, the band hosts a concert in the lower Geiger Center where they play a variety of cover songs.

While none of them get paid for their work, they continue to perform because of the students on campus.

“Dr. Crane and I were playing in the stage band for OBU’s 2007 Theatrical production of ‘Godspell’ and afterwards we decided to create a faculty rock band,” professor of Biology Dr. Bradley Jett said.

While the students get to see a different side of the professors when they preform, the professors also get to see a different side of the students.

“My favorite concert was probably in 2011,” Jett said.  “The crowd was really into it.  We played a Profs rendition of Miley Cyrus’s ‘Party in the U.S.A.’,” he said.

“The OBU students actually picked up another OBU student and started ‘crowd surfing’ him above their heads and passed him all around the G.C.,” he said.

The band members have said they enjoy performing, and say they would change one thing if they could.

“If I could change one thing I would change us playing together more,” professor of music Dr. Jim Vernon said.

While Vernon said he wanted to change the amount of time spent together, assistant professor of history Dr. D.H. Dilbeck said he might address the matter of compensation.

“I haven’t made a dime off this gig, and I would really like to get paid soon,” Dilbeck said.

All jokes aside, the professors say they look up to each other for inspiration.

“For me personally, I am way influenced by the outstanding talent of the guys in the band,” Vernon said. “They are great musicians, and I am proud they have let me in the group,” he said.

Not only do they look up to each other, they also look up to those musicians who came before them.

“As the immortal Dewey Finn says in the movie ‘School of Rock,’ ‘One great rock show can change the world’ That’s my goal–for the world to never be the same,” Dilbeck said.

While being influenced is an important part of playing music, so is learning from those with whom you are playing.

“My favorite part is being able to play the songs I love with people who are way more talented than I am,” Jett said. “I learn a lot from these talented individuals.”

While The Profs have no plans of going on tour, they do recognize how they are different from other rock-and-roll bands.

“We are different because of our early bed times and [benign] lifestyles,” Dilbeck said.

But that is not the only thing that sets The Profs apart from other cover bands.

“We don’t do it for money, glory or our own ambition,” Jett said. “We do it for the students.  For us, as OBU Professors, it’s all about the students.”

Column: drone deliveries: so close, yet so far

Yes, everyone seems to be anticipating the arrival of drone deliveries, and while all the pieces seem to be coming into place, it may be more complicated than it seems to get drones up and running commercially.

By Jason Burger, Assistant News Editor

There are videos of them all over the internet.  The rumors have been circulating since 2015.

The technology has been around for even longer than that, and it seems like two days is too much time to wait for packages to be delivered.

Yes, everyone seems to be anticipating the arrival of drone deliveries, and while all the pieces seem to be coming into place, it may be more complicated than it seems to get drones up and running commercially.

In mid June of 2015, Paul Misener, Amazon’s vice-president of global public policy, spoke to a Congressional hearing on the topic of drone usage to further speed up the process of delivering packages to customers.

He stated that the company would be ready to launch the use of drones once “all the rules were in place,” and also noted that the drones would not become operational until the company demonstrated that they could operate them safely.

Here’s another bit of information:  The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) only allows the flight of drones up to 55 pounds, and would require commercial pilots to fly them, along with permission to fly over private property.

Even a powerful 55-pound drone can only lift so much weight, so for large orders, are drones still the answer?

There are other reasons why drones still have a long way to go before they become the main form of parcel delivery.

There are still many factors to take into account when putting a drone up in the air.  A big one involves obstacles.

In an interview with the online publication The Guardian, Professor Sajiv Singh of Carnegie Mellon University robotics institute stated,

“They’re [Amazon] not proposing to deliver from one uninhabited place to another uninhabited place; they’re proposing to deliver from a warehouse to where the consumer is, which is likely an urban area or a suburban area,” he said.

“In those particular cases, there are going to be hazards along the way that the vehicle is going to have to detect. Maybe there will be terrain that the map doesn’t know about, unless you’ve mapped that exact route before. Even then, maybe there’s construction equipment that wasn’t there but is there now. Maybe GPS signals are blocked or partially blocked in which case it’s going to have an incorrect idea about where it is.”

Bottom line, there are too many independent variables to take into account.

What if the customer’s dog is in the landing zone of the drone?  What if the resident black crow doesn’t like the drone and attacks it? 

What if Uncle Jed doesn’t like the drone, and decides to load up his shotgun and get some skeet shooting practice?

Heaven forbid, what if the drone can’t detect little Suzie Johnson running around in the yard, and the drone collides with her or drops something on her?

These are worst case scenarios, but who’s to say that these problems wouldn’t happen?

Another broader scale problem with drone delivery is the range the technology has.

In a demo video that Amazon posted, a drone that supposedly has a range of 15 miles delivers a pair of soccer cleats (video available at  https://youtu.be/MXo_d6tNWuY).

This raises the obvious question, “What if a customer lives more than seven-and-a-half miles from where the drone takes off?”

That seems to limit the customer base that drones could influence.

Also, it is worth noting that it seems like these drones can only make one delivery per flight, as opposed to a delivery truck that can make hundreds of deliveries a day.

So are drones really that profitable? 

Amazon says yes, as they say it is estimated that it would only cost the company 88 cents per delivery. If they charge a dollar or more per delivery to the customer, that’s substantial profit. Due to the low starting cost, would drone shipping costs eventually be jacked way up due to popular demand?   

One other major problem that drone technology will have to overcome is the reality of delivering in urban areas.

Backtracking a little bit, Amazon will require its customers to have a designated “landing area” set up in the customer’s yard for the drone to land.

Despite the problems that could occur as discussed earlier, at least that type of system would deliver products in a private area, or on private property.

In a dense urban city area, how is that possible?  How is a drone going to deliver to an apartment, or a loft in a city block?

Maybe the building will have a designated drone landing area.

But even then, it seems like its going to be like the video game Call of Duty where everyone steals other players’ care packages that are dropped anywhere near their vicinity.

What kind of security can Amazon offer these customers?  Are drone pirates going to be the next big thing in organized crime? Who knows.

I get it.  Its 2017, and we are in a technological age.  Heck, it seems like we are finally living in the future that all the 1990’s movies said would come.

We have watches that make calls and receive texts, our phones can connect to our TV’s and we even have some electric cars that can drive themselves on cruise control.

Drone technology is very relevant, and it is also a growing, and very popular, industry.

In fact, I would even say I am all for drone deliveries.  I just think there is a need for many, many regulations, and further technology that has to be developed, before we let small, unmanned aircraft fly around our skies, drop boxes in our yards and become the main form of delivery service.

It’s pretty cool to think about philosophically, but may be terrifying in the immediate reality.     

Column: how to overcome spring fever and find motivation to finish strong

The symptoms of spring fever can include feelings of restlessness and excitement. Most students are looking forward to their summer plans. Extreme cases of spring fever are known as senioritis.

By Rebekah McPheeters, Contributing Writer

Students all across campus have seemed to lose motivation after Spring Break and are having trouble staying focused.  With 30 days of the semester left to go, it is important to maintain focus. 

The symptoms of spring fever can include feelings of restlessness and excitement.  Most students are looking forward to their summer plans.  Extreme cases of spring fever are known as senioritis. 

“The lack of motivation only increased my stress about all of the large assignments due in April,” senior Rebecca Lee said

Here are some of the top suggestions for getting through spring fever:

Keep a regular schedule. snooze.jpg

As the year moves on, all the strictly resolute plans to wake up early and get to bed on time are often not maintained.  However, if you can keep a regular schedule, your body is more at rest, and your mind is able to focus more. 

When you can, add a time to exercise to your schedule to decrease restlessness and increase mood.

“Whenever I started to exercise, I began to be more productive and relaxed during the day,” junior Amber Isaac said.

Keep track of your progress and success.

journal.jpgYou grow so much from semester to semester.

What seemed overwhelming last year is achievable this year.  Journaling is a good way to process through each day and learn how to keep improving. 

“Journaling regularly helps me keep everything in perspective,” junior history major Emily Storm said.

Write practical to-do lists. 

Goals should keep us moving forward, so plan goals and to-do lists that don’t overwhelm you.  College does not last forever, so work hard through the end and make each day count. to-do-list

“Rather than feeling discouraged by how much I didn’t get done, I am motivated by how much work from my to-do list I finished,” Isaac said. 

These three top tips for the spring semester may seem simple, but they can help motivate you through April and May. 

Don’t forget to enjoy the amazing weather.  Spending time outside is known to improve your mood. 

Use these tips to help you achieve amazing things through these last two months.

 

OBU Lacrosse suffers tough loss on senior night

By Kervy Robles, Sports Editor

Oklahoma Baptist lacrosse team hosted Rockhurst University for a Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference contest in its last home game of the season.

The Lady Bison seemed to have a great start when Paige Morrison scored two early goals to give OBU a short advantage.

However, the visitors reacted and found the end of the net five consecutive times to send the game to a 10-4 halftime score for the Hawks.

By Kervy Robles, Sports Editor

Oklahoma Baptist lacrosse team hosted Rockhurst University for a Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference contest in its last home game of the season.

The Lady Bison seemed to have a great start when Paige Morrison scored two early goals to give OBU a short advantage.

However, the visitors reacted and found the end of the net five consecutive times to send the game to a 10-4 halftime score for the Hawks.

Freshmen Breanna Wichert and  Lauren McCormack contributed a pair of goals to shortened the score.

With six minutes minutes left, junior Alexis Martin scored a goal after an assist from Allison Ingrim.

The Lady Bison added three more goals in the second period, but Rockhusrt kept pushing and beat freshman goalkeeper Courney Barnickle in nine opportunities.

The final score was 19-7 resulting a tough loss for OBU on Senior Day.

The Lady Bison registers a 2-6 RMAC and 4-8 overall record.

The lacrosse team will close the spring season when the Lady Bison visit Lindenwood, MO. OBU will face Mckendree University April 20 and April 22.