St. Gregory’s campus gets a new name

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

OBU’s newest addition has a new name. The former Saint Gregory’s University campus, which OBU is leasing from Hobby Lobby, is now called the “OBU Green Campus.”

Paula Gower, Associate VP for Marketing and Communications, said the new name draws inspiration from a few sources.

“The name carries a double meaning honoring the Green family, owners of Hobby Lobby, and the color green, as one of OBU’s official university colors,” she said.

In 1970, David Green started a home business with a 600-dollar loan of making miniature picture frames.

Now, Green and his family are worth 7.6 billion dollars, Forbes reports, and Hobby Lobby stores in 47 states have brought in 4.6 billion dollars.

Hobby Lobby also founded the Museum of the Bible in Washington D.C. in 2017.

In December 2018, Hobby Lobby purchased the campus after SGU ceased operations. They then decided to lease the campus to OBU.

Gower said OBU is already starting to use the campus and has plans for future use.

“Several of our athletic teams have been using the gyms for practices,” she said. “Plans are still underway to use the theatre as a venue for some of our fine arts events. However, inspections had to be completed prior to being able to host any performances there.”

Gower said evaluations are in progress for spaces in Benedictine Hall.

“Science labs and other academic spaces are being evaluated by faculty to determine their use based on need in the coming semesters,” she said. “Other parts of campus will be used for meeting spaces, to host events, and to supplement and enhance our ability to rent spaces for community use.”

OBU recently put signs up as well so visitors know the campus is part of OBU now.

Seniors present time capsule as gift

By Chelsea Weeks, Editor-In-Chief

As OBU seniors prepare for graduation and life after Bison Hill, they decided to give a gift that will help them, and future students remember what life was like at OBU in 2019. The 2019 Oklahoma Baptist University Senior Class is donating a time capsule as their senior gift to the university.

OBU Senior Class President Casey House said they wanted to preserve a glimpse of what life on Bison Hill was like during their time spent on campus.

“This capsule is an opportunity to reflect on the life in the world today and at OBU,” House said. “It’s also an opportunity to consider the future, what we want to become in the 40 years and how we want the world to change.”

The OBU Class of 2019 Time Capsule is a stainless-steel container that has the ability to last for 200 years, but House said they will only be waiting 50 to years to open it.

The time capsule will be dug up and opened Saturday, April 26, 2059. Occasional reminders will be sent out to prevent the class from forgetting about the capsule.

The time capsule was buried Friday, April 26, 2019, at 5:00 p.m. in the southeast flowerbed by the fountain in the oval. There will be a plaque at the burial site with information regarding the opening ceremony.

“For preserving a glimpse of what life was like today, we are trying to include a variety of things in the capsule, from the trivial to the sublime,” House said. “[Examples include] A picture of you and your friends with signatures on the back of the picture, a collection of the best tweets of President Whitlock signed by him, a CAB show program, a golf ball with St. Gregory’s University insignia, a metal nail from the new bison sculpture, a record of traditions and memories… the list goes on.”

Senior theatre major McKenzie Reece donated two envelopes; one with pictures of her and eight of her best friends and the other is full of quotes that were said throughout their four years on Bison Hill.

“I thought that pictures and quotes would show perspective of how far we all have come from our time at OBU in 50 years,” Reece said. “I think that it will be sweet to reminisce in 50 years and remember all of the good times and hard times. I believe that the friendships I have made here will last the rest of my life and I could not be more grateful!”

Senior health and human performance major Savannah Payne donated two “day in the life” papers, one was written about 2019 and the other about her predictions for 2059. She also donated a letter to her 62-year-old self from the perspective of her 22-year-old self and photos of spots around campus and her friends.

“I think that opening the time capsule in 40 years and seeing memories from my college years will be so meaningful,” she said.

Payne said she donated to the time capsule because she wanted to leave a piece of her life at OBU in 2019 behind for future students and alumni to see.

“I think the time capsule will serve to unite the Class of 2019 in its creation and again when we open it in 2059,” Payne said. “I think that opening the time capsule in 2059 will be an event that current students will be interested to attend as well and make them reflect on their own experiences at OBU and look forward to leaving their own legacy behind.”

Student overcomes childhood trauma

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

During her fourth, fifth and sixth grade years, junior nursing major Jillian Murphy was sexually assaulted by someone close to her family.

“I don’t even know how many times over the three years it happened,” she said.

She said she was scared to go forward and tell anyone because he was close to her family, and she didn’t know how people would react.

“I would never scream,” she said. “I was scared, so I would just sit, and I would just lay. I wouldn’t move.”

Murphy said she started feeling like it was her fault because she let it go on so long without telling anyone. In middle school, she said she finally came forward and told her mom, but the pain didn’t stop.

“My mom told me it was like everybody was walking on eggshells around me because they didn’t want me to break,” she said.

Murphy said after she came forward she didn’t want anyone to touch her or talk to her. She said she went through several phases after she came forward. In the first one, she didn’t want to feel anything.

“It hurt too much,” she said.

In the second phase, she didn’t care what she did.

“Hurt people hurt people,” she said. “I was really hurt, so I was hurting everyone around me.”

In the last phase, she tried to be a good person on the outside.

“I tried to get the best grades,” she said. “I wanted to be the best person.”

Then, she said, she broke.

“Nothing I was trying was working,” Murphy said.

At a Disciple Now conference with her church during her freshman year of high school, Murphy heard a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep, how the shepherd left the 99 sheep just to find the lost one.

“So, You’re going after me,” Murphy said she thought about God. “I’m not alone.”

This is when Murphy said she became a Christian, and this experience became the subject of her book “This is Why” published June 2017. Murphy said she knew she was supposed to write about her being sexually assaulted, but she didn’t want to.

“I was thinking, ‘You can’t use this for good,’” she said.“I get it now. I would’ve never wanted this to happen, but if this is what You’re going to put in my hand to bring You glory, I’ll use it.”

CPN hosts Walk to raise awareness of child abuse

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

The Citizen Potawatomi Nation FireLodge Children and Family Services is hosting a Fun Walk to raise awareness of Child Abuse. The Bison spoke with Darian Towner, family preservation coordinator, to learn more about the event.

What is the Fun Walk?

The Fun Walk is a free public event on Friday, April 26th at noon that CPN FireLodge Children and Family Services is hosting as a result of April being National Child Abuse Prevention Month. We will be walking around the FireLake Lake, just West of the FireLake Ball Fields off Hardest Road in Shawnee. The first 50 attendees will receive a free t-shirt and blue pinwheel and all attendees will have a chance to win a free 43’’ smart TV. We encourage attendees to wear blue to show your support!!

Why is CPN doing the event?

Our program is hosting the event as a way to involve our community directly in raising awareness of child abuse and neglect and inform the public of the services we provide. Our goal is that raising awareness will lead to community members taking action in both preventing and speaking out against child abuse. Additionally, our desire is that families whose children are experiencing child abuse or neglect will reach out for services. The blue pinwheels we will have placed around the lake are representative of the bright and safe future that all children deserve. We hope that our community will decide to attend and stand up to be a voice for children.

Who can go? What’s the cost to go?

The Fun Walk is completely open to the public and is kid-friendly! It is an absolutely free event. Grab a friend and join us for just one hour!

Is this the first year to do this?

This is the first Fun Walk in honor of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, but our program is eager to begin holding the event annually.

What does the CPN FireLodge Children and Family Services do?

CPN FireLodge Children and Family Services serves as a local resource to the community for confidential services geared toward youth and families. An emphasis is placed on Native Americans to enhance, enrich, and develop cultural awareness in the areas of health and wellness. There are four programs that exist within our department: Indian Child Welfare, Foster Care/Adoption, Family Preservation and Adult Protective Services.

Why is it important to raise awareness of child abuse?

It is important to raise awareness of child abuse so that there is an accurate understanding of what child abuse is, the forms it can take, how often it occurs and what practical steps can be done to prevent it from occurring.

For more information on the FunWalk, Towner said she can be reached at 405-878-4831. Towner said there is also a plan in place in case of rain to have the event inside The Place, located at 2346 S Gordon Cooper Dr, Tecumseh, OK. The Place is down the street from the ball fields, Towner said.

JMAS students win, meet governor at OAB conference

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

For journalism students, college years are spent perfecting portfolios and learning on the job. For many, part of that learning and portfolio building comes from the on-campus broadcast network, The Okay Show.

Students who work for the show won several awards April 4 at the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters 2019 conference.

The winners are:

• Olivianna Calmes, Winner of the Mark Rawlings Scholarship

• Charles Downum, first in Radio Narrative

• Jacob Jolly, Loren Rhoades, Olivianna Calmes, second in TV Narrative

• Zach Bush, second in TV Music Video

• Wyatt Winters and Sheridan Wiles, third in Screenwriting

• Tamlyn Price, third in Radio Narrative

Professor Stephen Draper organized the event for the OBU students and said he was proud of the individuals who won.

“We’re competing against literally the best and brightest in the entire state, OU and OSU and others, and so you might think we’re just a small school, but we have consecutively won every year,” Draper said. “It just continues to show how strong a school program it is.”

The Okay Show used to be called OBU TV-News, and it was solely a news broadcast.

With the new branding of the Okay Show, Draper said there is more opportunity for students to participate in ways that fit their goals.

“Not everybody wants to learn broadcast journalism or print journalism; not everyone wants narrative or marketing or any of these things,” he said.“ Students are getting to do what interests them. That’s where learning really takes place when you can take what is your field and then you can actually make it interesting and joyful.”

Olivianna Calmes, lead anchor for the Okay Show said she shared the same sentiment.

“It allows you to really be yourself and create what you want, with people helping you along the way,” she said. “The Okay Show is a variety show with different segments. The different segments are done by different students and are showcased separately on the Okay show’s playlists. There is probably a segment you will like from it, whether it’s our movie reviews (ER), paranormal norm, the funny banter between the anchors, the witty sports anchor or the great weather guy.”

Calmes said the show is integral to the learning experience of journalism students, and is where the most valuable part of their education comes from.

“It is important for our campus because it gives media students, and really anyone, the opportunity to gain experience working with professional equipment and channel their creativity,” she said.

Draper said he is excited to see the future of the show.

“My greatest joy right now is kind of getting to see that it really presents a solid future for programming for the years to come.”

The Okay Show director, Braden Wade, said he has hopes for the show as well.

“I hope people can find something in the show they enjoy doing,” Wade said. “And people in my class will get the same joy and passions.”

He said he also hopes the show will eventually learn how to function like the real world because he wants his peers to be prepared to thrive. The Okay Show posts on Youtube Fridays at 5 p.m.

Long-lost first edition Tolkien books returned to OBU

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

After 47 years, three first-edition “Lord of The Rings” trilogy books have returned to OBU’s library.

Originally published in 1962 and 1963, the books were apparently stolen and replaced in 1972 by an anonymous thief.

The stolen books were first American unrevised editions, thirteenth printings of “The Fellowship of the Ring,” “The Two Towers” and “The Return of the King” and were replaced with first revised editions of the books.

Last month though, the thief mailed the books back to OBU.

In a letter included with the books, the thief expressed remorse for stealing them and said, “I have no excuse for my action, other than a desire to have one of the unrevised editions in my collection.”

The stolen books were probably worth around ten dollars each in 1972, but now are worth over 300 dollars, he said.

The director of library services, Julie Rankin, said it is unknown how the Library first got “The Lord of the Rings” books, but she is excited to have the books back at OBU after so long.

They are now being added to the Library’s special collections.

The special collections, housed in the basement of the Mabee Center, includes old books unable to be checked out because of their condition, gifts from various donors and more.

One of the goals of the Mabee Center, Rankin said, is to get all of the special collections archived online, but for now, not all of them are cataloged.

As it stands now though, anyone can browse and read the books in the special collections with a librarian’s supervision.

In the collection, several aisles are dedicated to the collection of Alan Day, the pastor of First Baptist Church of Edmond and vice-chair of OBU’s board of trustees.

In 2011, Day was killed when his motorcycle hit a patch of sand on an off-ramp, the Oklahoman reported.

Day’s collection is mostly comprised of theology and Christian books.

Former president Mark Brister also donated some books to OBU’s Special Collections.

In the J.W. Storer collection, works such as 1909 editions of Shakespeare’s plays and Adolf Hitler’s autobiography “Mein Kampf” are included.

Every “Life Magazine” from 1937 to when the magazine ended in 2000 is also available to be viewed.

“Anyone can find something interesting to them down here,” Rankin said

Remembering tragedy: OKC bombing memories still strong 24 years later

By Chelsea Weeks and Loren Rhoades, Editor-In-Chief and Assistant Features Editor

“I was actually walking out to come to work that morning and heard it. You could hear it from that far away.”

– Bobby Cox, baseball coach and assistant professor of KAL

April 19, a day of sorrow and remembrance for many Oklahomans. On that date 24 years ago, ex-army soldier Timothy McVeigh parked a Ryder rental truck in front of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. The truck contained a fertilizer bomb that after being detonated led to the death of 168 people and the injury of over 650 others.

Until September 11, 2001, McVeigh’s act of violence and terrorism was the deadliest attack to ever occur in the United States.

For most students on OBU’s campus, the April 19th bombing is an event that occurred before their birth, but for some OBU faculty and staff members, it is a day they will always remember.

“I was actually walking out to come to work that morning and heard it,” baseball coach and assistant professor of KALS, Bobby Cox said. “You could hear it from that far away.”

Cox said the baseball team was supposed to compete against Oklahoma City the next day but canceled the game due to the tragedy. The team rescheduled the game for a few days later and witnessed the wreckage on their way there.

“So, you’re driving across town and you could see it was still smoking at the time,” Cox said. “The interstate was raised at that point so you could see down in there and it was just like total silence.”

Different professors on campus said it was a time filled with questions for Oklahomans as well as for students on Bison Hill.

“If I had to describe it, it was just a lot of confusion,” HHP professor Dr. Norris Russell said. “There was a lot of ‘why?’ and ‘what’s the deal?’ It took a while for the whole situation to finally unravel.”

Although the event caused a large amount of heartache, it also brought people closer together. People from all over the U.S. were heading toward OKC to see how they could help in some way.

Professor of history Dr. Carol Humphrey said there were also OBU students with the desire to aid those who were affected by the bombing.

“There were a lot of students at the time who weren’t from Oklahoma, so they were shocked by it, but they also wanted to see if there was a way to help out,” Humphrey said. “So, I think in some ways it did bring people together in ways that had not been true before.”

The Murrah Building bombing changed the lives of so many forever. In response to the domestic terrorist act, U.S. President Bill Clinton signed the Oklahoma City National Memorial Act of 1997, which established the site as a National Memorial. A task force of over 350 people was assigned by Oklahoma City mayor Ron Norick to memorialize those who were lost in the attack.

The Oklahoma City National Memorial was formally dedicated April 19, 2000, five years after the bombing. The Museum was dedicated a year later February 19, 2001. The mission statement of the Memorial was to “remember those who were killed, those who survived and those changed forever.”

The Outdoor Symbolic Memorial consists of a multitude of elements to honors those who were lost.

Twin bronze gates frame the entrances to the memorial. 9:01 is found in the eastern gate and represents the last moments of peace. 9:03 is found on the western gate and represents the first moments of recovery.

In between these two gates lie the Reflecting Pool, a thin layer of water running over black granite. Those who peer into the Reflecting pool are supposed to see “a face of a person changed by domestic terrorism.”

168 empty chairs made from bronze, glass and stone can be found south of the Reflecting Pool. Etched in each chair is the name of a lost father, mother, brother, sister – a family member, a victim of hatred. The chairs were designed to represent an empty chair at the dinner table of a victim’s family.

In the southwest corner, the only remnants of the Murray Building have been transformed into the Survival Wall. Granite salvaged from the Murray Building has been inscribed with the names of over 800 survivors.

The 112-year-old American Elm that used to offer shade to vehicles, was damaged from the blast. Evidence of the attack was found in the branches and bark of the old tree. Many thought it would be lost, but a year later it began to bud and continue to grow. Its determination to survive mirrors the determination of those impacted by the attack.

On the anniversary of the attack, seeds from the Survivor Tree are sent across the country to be planted. For the 22nd anniversary in 2017, a Survivor Tree seed was planted right here on Bison Hill and can be found south of Raley Chapel.

The 33,000 square foot Memorial Museum strives to tell the story of the horrific domestic attack and the hope that followed after.

The cost is $15 for adults, $12 for students and free for children under fi ve. People from all over the country come to visit the site and get involved.

The 16th Annual Oklahoma City Memorial Marathon will take place Sunday, April 28, 2019. There will be a variety of races available for all individuals including a full and half marathon, a 5k, a kids marathon and a relay marathon. For more information about the race or to sign

Mentors Club gets back on its feet with Mission Shawnee’s help

By Cal Brown, Assistant News Editor

The OBU Mentors Club is now working with Mission Shawnee after months of set back.

All of the potential students for the Adopt-a-School Initiative are now going through the Mentors Club. The club will be run by students. A small team of Enactus members, spearheaded by sophomore accounting major Anthony Gorum, spent months working on the merger.

“We (Enactus) thought of the idea of helping Mission Shawnee out by getting more OBU students involved in mentorship in their after-school program, said Gorum. “However we found that it was harder to get OBU students involved as we couldn’t directly advertise because of some legal issues. So we talked to Melissa Stroud and she connected us with the existing but not yet functional OBU’s Mentors Club.”

The Mentors Club was established this year as a way of connecting students to the Afterschool Program of Mission Shawnee.

The club had created a constitution and delegated roles, and their first meeting was set for September.

However, the club had no faculty advisor and every single member quit before the first meeting.

“OBU’s Mentors Club never came to fruition,” Gorum said. “The leadership backed out two months ago. We spent a long time trying to contact leadership for nothing.”’

The first meeting for potential club members was on April 8 at 10 a.m., and more meetings have been scheduled for subsequent Mondays. The club’s focus is on tutoring kids after school in low-income families.

“We will meet elementary and middle school kids,” head of Mission Shawnee Ryan Brooks said. “You can choose which grade you want. Mentors meet once a week for two hours to focus on tutoring and building relationships with a mentee. A mentor will spend 30 minutes tutoring a kid directly. We also have a Bible story we have all the kids participate in. That is the structure of everything at the moment. Boys would get paired with boys and girls would get paired with girls. At the end of the day, we need role models to be a positive influence on their lives.”

As of now, mentors would work Tuesdays and Thursday with elementary schools, and Wednesday with the middle schools.

The club is headed in a positive direction, but it will need new members if it hopes to survive. Those who’ve experienced this new direction find it worthwhile.

“I was the intern at Mission Shawnee last year,” sophomore pastoral ministry major Collyn Dixon said. “I got to hang out with lots of kids. I promise, kids will want to talk to you. Dude, they will talk about anything.”

The club will not be matching any new members with kids this year. Instead, their meetings will be focused on fixing the political side of the club.

“I don’t want to make matches right now because of the school year ending soon,” Brooks said. “We don’t know your schedule next year, so we won’t know if you would be able to work with the same kid next year. We don’t want you to get attached to each other and then not see each other after this. So far, our goal is to learn more about your interests. We try to match kids and mentors based on personality.”

Any potential club members will need to figure out their schedule so the leaders can work with them on good times to meet with kids.

“We are hoping to bring kids over to campus,” Gorum said. “Or if we get enough club members, we could carpool. We are trying to make it easier on you guys because we know not everyone has a car.”

Mission Shawnee’s The Summit has first meeting April 8

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

Mission Shawnee exists to educate, equip and dignify marginalized individuals in the Shawnee community through relationships rooted in the love of Jesus Christ.

The Summit is a ministry of Mission Shawnee. It’s a mentorship program in which Mission Shawnee trains students to create and sustain relationships.

The Summit mentors students at three different schools around Shawnee, Horace Mann Elementary, Shawnee Middle School and Will Rogers Elementary.

There are three principles The Summit uses to teach: “Show Up,” be consistent so you can build trust with a mentee; “Live Out,” modeling good character for your mentee; “Speak In,” “speaking into,” a mentee’s life with grace.

Mentors that are a part of The Summit serve once a week after attending Adopt A School training, passing a background check, and being matched with a mentee.

For more information, there is a table in the lower GC where you can sign up for a mailing list. The Mentor Club’s first meeting is April 8 at 10 a.m in the Upper GC.

MissionShawneeok.org has more information on Mission Shawnee’s volunteer and internship opportunities, including marketing, graphic design, youth development, education and social work positions.

Mission Shawnee is located at 126 S Center and can be reached at 405-802-8318 or missionshawneeok@yahoo.com.

‘Blitz Week’ starts next week

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

Every year, “Blitz Week” raises money for a cause of the committee’s choosing.

This year, the money raised through the different events will go to campus-run GO-Trips.

Blitz Week starts April 8 and will end April 12.

The night before Blitz Week starts, a Paintathon will take place in the lower GC. For the rest of the week, an auction will take place to sell the artwork.

Monday Blitz week chapel and the varsity vs. faculty basketball game take place.

Two dollars is the admission price for the game.

The UCS Trivia Night is Tuesday night. Teams can sign up and pay two dollars per member to play.

All week there will be an Escape Room in the Library. Teams of four can pay two dollars per member to try to escape.

Humans vs. Zombies is also going on all week. Students can pay two dollars to participate in the Nerf war.

Wednesday is Qdoba night. Thursday is the famed Mr. Bison Pageant.

Sign-ups for all Blitz Week events are in the lower GC, and t-shirts are for sale for 12 dollars.