St. Gregory’s campus gets a new name

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

OBU’s newest addition has a new name. The former Saint Gregory’s University campus, which OBU is leasing from Hobby Lobby, is now called the “OBU Green Campus.”

Paula Gower, Associate VP for Marketing and Communications, said the new name draws inspiration from a few sources.

“The name carries a double meaning honoring the Green family, owners of Hobby Lobby, and the color green, as one of OBU’s official university colors,” she said.

In 1970, David Green started a home business with a 600-dollar loan of making miniature picture frames.

Now, Green and his family are worth 7.6 billion dollars, Forbes reports, and Hobby Lobby stores in 47 states have brought in 4.6 billion dollars.

Hobby Lobby also founded the Museum of the Bible in Washington D.C. in 2017.

In December 2018, Hobby Lobby purchased the campus after SGU ceased operations. They then decided to lease the campus to OBU.

Gower said OBU is already starting to use the campus and has plans for future use.

“Several of our athletic teams have been using the gyms for practices,” she said. “Plans are still underway to use the theatre as a venue for some of our fine arts events. However, inspections had to be completed prior to being able to host any performances there.”

Gower said evaluations are in progress for spaces in Benedictine Hall.

“Science labs and other academic spaces are being evaluated by faculty to determine their use based on need in the coming semesters,” she said. “Other parts of campus will be used for meeting spaces, to host events, and to supplement and enhance our ability to rent spaces for community use.”

OBU recently put signs up as well so visitors know the campus is part of OBU now.

Student overcomes childhood trauma

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

During her fourth, fifth and sixth grade years, junior nursing major Jillian Murphy was sexually assaulted by someone close to her family.

“I don’t even know how many times over the three years it happened,” she said.

She said she was scared to go forward and tell anyone because he was close to her family, and she didn’t know how people would react.

“I would never scream,” she said. “I was scared, so I would just sit, and I would just lay. I wouldn’t move.”

Murphy said she started feeling like it was her fault because she let it go on so long without telling anyone. In middle school, she said she finally came forward and told her mom, but the pain didn’t stop.

“My mom told me it was like everybody was walking on eggshells around me because they didn’t want me to break,” she said.

Murphy said after she came forward she didn’t want anyone to touch her or talk to her. She said she went through several phases after she came forward. In the first one, she didn’t want to feel anything.

“It hurt too much,” she said.

In the second phase, she didn’t care what she did.

“Hurt people hurt people,” she said. “I was really hurt, so I was hurting everyone around me.”

In the last phase, she tried to be a good person on the outside.

“I tried to get the best grades,” she said. “I wanted to be the best person.”

Then, she said, she broke.

“Nothing I was trying was working,” Murphy said.

At a Disciple Now conference with her church during her freshman year of high school, Murphy heard a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep, how the shepherd left the 99 sheep just to find the lost one.

“So, You’re going after me,” Murphy said she thought about God. “I’m not alone.”

This is when Murphy said she became a Christian, and this experience became the subject of her book “This is Why” published June 2017. Murphy said she knew she was supposed to write about her being sexually assaulted, but she didn’t want to.

“I was thinking, ‘You can’t use this for good,’” she said.“I get it now. I would’ve never wanted this to happen, but if this is what You’re going to put in my hand to bring You glory, I’ll use it.”

CPN hosts Walk to raise awareness of child abuse

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

The Citizen Potawatomi Nation FireLodge Children and Family Services is hosting a Fun Walk to raise awareness of Child Abuse. The Bison spoke with Darian Towner, family preservation coordinator, to learn more about the event.

What is the Fun Walk?

The Fun Walk is a free public event on Friday, April 26th at noon that CPN FireLodge Children and Family Services is hosting as a result of April being National Child Abuse Prevention Month. We will be walking around the FireLake Lake, just West of the FireLake Ball Fields off Hardest Road in Shawnee. The first 50 attendees will receive a free t-shirt and blue pinwheel and all attendees will have a chance to win a free 43’’ smart TV. We encourage attendees to wear blue to show your support!!

Why is CPN doing the event?

Our program is hosting the event as a way to involve our community directly in raising awareness of child abuse and neglect and inform the public of the services we provide. Our goal is that raising awareness will lead to community members taking action in both preventing and speaking out against child abuse. Additionally, our desire is that families whose children are experiencing child abuse or neglect will reach out for services. The blue pinwheels we will have placed around the lake are representative of the bright and safe future that all children deserve. We hope that our community will decide to attend and stand up to be a voice for children.

Who can go? What’s the cost to go?

The Fun Walk is completely open to the public and is kid-friendly! It is an absolutely free event. Grab a friend and join us for just one hour!

Is this the first year to do this?

This is the first Fun Walk in honor of National Child Abuse Prevention Month, but our program is eager to begin holding the event annually.

What does the CPN FireLodge Children and Family Services do?

CPN FireLodge Children and Family Services serves as a local resource to the community for confidential services geared toward youth and families. An emphasis is placed on Native Americans to enhance, enrich, and develop cultural awareness in the areas of health and wellness. There are four programs that exist within our department: Indian Child Welfare, Foster Care/Adoption, Family Preservation and Adult Protective Services.

Why is it important to raise awareness of child abuse?

It is important to raise awareness of child abuse so that there is an accurate understanding of what child abuse is, the forms it can take, how often it occurs and what practical steps can be done to prevent it from occurring.

For more information on the FunWalk, Towner said she can be reached at 405-878-4831. Towner said there is also a plan in place in case of rain to have the event inside The Place, located at 2346 S Gordon Cooper Dr, Tecumseh, OK. The Place is down the street from the ball fields, Towner said.

JMAS students win, meet governor at OAB conference

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

For journalism students, college years are spent perfecting portfolios and learning on the job. For many, part of that learning and portfolio building comes from the on-campus broadcast network, The Okay Show.

Students who work for the show won several awards April 4 at the Oklahoma Association of Broadcasters 2019 conference.

The winners are:

• Olivianna Calmes, Winner of the Mark Rawlings Scholarship

• Charles Downum, first in Radio Narrative

• Jacob Jolly, Loren Rhoades, Olivianna Calmes, second in TV Narrative

• Zach Bush, second in TV Music Video

• Wyatt Winters and Sheridan Wiles, third in Screenwriting

• Tamlyn Price, third in Radio Narrative

Professor Stephen Draper organized the event for the OBU students and said he was proud of the individuals who won.

“We’re competing against literally the best and brightest in the entire state, OU and OSU and others, and so you might think we’re just a small school, but we have consecutively won every year,” Draper said. “It just continues to show how strong a school program it is.”

The Okay Show used to be called OBU TV-News, and it was solely a news broadcast.

With the new branding of the Okay Show, Draper said there is more opportunity for students to participate in ways that fit their goals.

“Not everybody wants to learn broadcast journalism or print journalism; not everyone wants narrative or marketing or any of these things,” he said.“ Students are getting to do what interests them. That’s where learning really takes place when you can take what is your field and then you can actually make it interesting and joyful.”

Olivianna Calmes, lead anchor for the Okay Show said she shared the same sentiment.

“It allows you to really be yourself and create what you want, with people helping you along the way,” she said. “The Okay Show is a variety show with different segments. The different segments are done by different students and are showcased separately on the Okay show’s playlists. There is probably a segment you will like from it, whether it’s our movie reviews (ER), paranormal norm, the funny banter between the anchors, the witty sports anchor or the great weather guy.”

Calmes said the show is integral to the learning experience of journalism students, and is where the most valuable part of their education comes from.

“It is important for our campus because it gives media students, and really anyone, the opportunity to gain experience working with professional equipment and channel their creativity,” she said.

Draper said he is excited to see the future of the show.

“My greatest joy right now is kind of getting to see that it really presents a solid future for programming for the years to come.”

The Okay Show director, Braden Wade, said he has hopes for the show as well.

“I hope people can find something in the show they enjoy doing,” Wade said. “And people in my class will get the same joy and passions.”

He said he also hopes the show will eventually learn how to function like the real world because he wants his peers to be prepared to thrive. The Okay Show posts on Youtube Fridays at 5 p.m.

Long-lost first edition Tolkien books returned to OBU

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

After 47 years, three first-edition “Lord of The Rings” trilogy books have returned to OBU’s library.

Originally published in 1962 and 1963, the books were apparently stolen and replaced in 1972 by an anonymous thief.

The stolen books were first American unrevised editions, thirteenth printings of “The Fellowship of the Ring,” “The Two Towers” and “The Return of the King” and were replaced with first revised editions of the books.

Last month though, the thief mailed the books back to OBU.

In a letter included with the books, the thief expressed remorse for stealing them and said, “I have no excuse for my action, other than a desire to have one of the unrevised editions in my collection.”

The stolen books were probably worth around ten dollars each in 1972, but now are worth over 300 dollars, he said.

The director of library services, Julie Rankin, said it is unknown how the Library first got “The Lord of the Rings” books, but she is excited to have the books back at OBU after so long.

They are now being added to the Library’s special collections.

The special collections, housed in the basement of the Mabee Center, includes old books unable to be checked out because of their condition, gifts from various donors and more.

One of the goals of the Mabee Center, Rankin said, is to get all of the special collections archived online, but for now, not all of them are cataloged.

As it stands now though, anyone can browse and read the books in the special collections with a librarian’s supervision.

In the collection, several aisles are dedicated to the collection of Alan Day, the pastor of First Baptist Church of Edmond and vice-chair of OBU’s board of trustees.

In 2011, Day was killed when his motorcycle hit a patch of sand on an off-ramp, the Oklahoman reported.

Day’s collection is mostly comprised of theology and Christian books.

Former president Mark Brister also donated some books to OBU’s Special Collections.

In the J.W. Storer collection, works such as 1909 editions of Shakespeare’s plays and Adolf Hitler’s autobiography “Mein Kampf” are included.

Every “Life Magazine” from 1937 to when the magazine ended in 2000 is also available to be viewed.

“Anyone can find something interesting to them down here,” Rankin said

Mission Shawnee’s The Summit has first meeting April 8

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

Mission Shawnee exists to educate, equip and dignify marginalized individuals in the Shawnee community through relationships rooted in the love of Jesus Christ.

The Summit is a ministry of Mission Shawnee. It’s a mentorship program in which Mission Shawnee trains students to create and sustain relationships.

The Summit mentors students at three different schools around Shawnee, Horace Mann Elementary, Shawnee Middle School and Will Rogers Elementary.

There are three principles The Summit uses to teach: “Show Up,” be consistent so you can build trust with a mentee; “Live Out,” modeling good character for your mentee; “Speak In,” “speaking into,” a mentee’s life with grace.

Mentors that are a part of The Summit serve once a week after attending Adopt A School training, passing a background check, and being matched with a mentee.

For more information, there is a table in the lower GC where you can sign up for a mailing list. The Mentor Club’s first meeting is April 8 at 10 a.m in the Upper GC.

MissionShawneeok.org has more information on Mission Shawnee’s volunteer and internship opportunities, including marketing, graphic design, youth development, education and social work positions.

Mission Shawnee is located at 126 S Center and can be reached at 405-802-8318 or missionshawneeok@yahoo.com.

‘Blitz Week’ starts next week

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

Every year, “Blitz Week” raises money for a cause of the committee’s choosing.

This year, the money raised through the different events will go to campus-run GO-Trips.

Blitz Week starts April 8 and will end April 12.

The night before Blitz Week starts, a Paintathon will take place in the lower GC. For the rest of the week, an auction will take place to sell the artwork.

Monday Blitz week chapel and the varsity vs. faculty basketball game take place.

Two dollars is the admission price for the game.

The UCS Trivia Night is Tuesday night. Teams can sign up and pay two dollars per member to play.

All week there will be an Escape Room in the Library. Teams of four can pay two dollars per member to try to escape.

Humans vs. Zombies is also going on all week. Students can pay two dollars to participate in the Nerf war.

Wednesday is Qdoba night. Thursday is the famed Mr. Bison Pageant.

Sign-ups for all Blitz Week events are in the lower GC, and t-shirts are for sale for 12 dollars.

Local family goes to war against boredom

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

For years, downtown Shawnee looked like a ghost town. No cars. No patrons. And blocks full of empty buildings.

If anyone wanted to have a fun evening, they had to go all the way to Oklahoma City for entertainment.

Shawnee couple Beau and Misty Dorrough were one of the many victims of Shawnee’s boredom epidemic.

They had to drag their five children all the way to the city and pay an arm and a leg just for one family outing.

“That kinda hurts,” Beau said.

That was the norm for a long time.

“You’ll see a lot of kids over spring break or the summer doing nothing.”

Last year, though, the Dorroughs got an idea on how to end the plight. Beau, a post office worker, repaired retro arcade games on the side.

“We owned hundreds of them,” Beau said.

The Dorroughs thought they could put the games to use and open an old-school arcade. So, they bought the building at 1 East Main Street downtown in late October 2018 and started planning.

“Right when we bought the building though, they opened the [arcade] down the street.”

Bell St. Retro Arcade is a welcome new business, putting some color in downtown Shawnee, but now the Dorroughs had to come up with a new idea.

The top two floors of the Dorroughs’ building are rented out as apartments, and the Dorroughs thought maybe renting out the first floor as well would be best.

They were brainstorming other possible business ideas when they found inspiration right in their own home.

Their children solved Shawnee’s boredom problem without even trying.

“Our kids love playing Nerf in the kitchen,” Beau said. “They’ll play for hours in such a small space.”

A Nerf Gun arena hadn’t even crossed Beau’s mind, as the main room on the first floor is a bit smaller.

But, seeing his family playing showed him kids can have fun with Nerf guns even in a spot like the first floor of their building.

Now, they had their business plan, but then came another problem.

The building hasn’t had a business in it for almost a decade. A lot of repairs needed to be done.

“We don’t have a ton of money, so we can’t pay for [contractors],” Beau said. “Most of the renovations we would have to do ourselves. We’re not professionals. We were scared about how we could get the building to where it needed to be.”

This was in January. In just over two months Beau and Misty, along with Misty’s brother and the one handyman they could afford, completely changed the building from an empty shell to a neon war zone.

“We painted everything,” Beau said. “Of course, when we painted the walls green, everyone thought, ‘marijuana shop’.”

When the Dorroughs bought the building, the lights had no light switches. Now they do.

Misty’s brother wired in a blacklight system so the arena can be glow-in-the-dark.

They put in neon trash-cans and tires for players to hide behind, and floor mats to have a soft floor instead of tile.

Now that almost everything is finished, the Dorroughs plan to open Nerfed Battle Arena April 6, and are hopeful for what Nerfed can be for the community.

“One, a really good place for the kids to have something to do,” Misty said.“There’s not enough of that in this town.”

It’s also a relief to parents who work all day. When their kids want to go do something, instead of trekking all the way to OKC after being at work all day, Nerfed is right down the road on Main Street. The Dorroughs want Nerfed to be more than just a free-for-all arena, too.

“We really want to make it more interactive,” Misty said. “We’ll have refs with whistles who can judge when someone gets out. There will be rules to make it more interesting than just go out and shoot.”

This isn’t a money making venture for the Dorroughs either.

“We don’t assume we’ll make a ton of money,” Beau said. “As long as it’s self-sufficient and everyone has fun, that’s it.”

Nerfed Indoor Battle Arena opens to the public April 6. Nerfed will be open Tuesday through Thursday from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m., Friday from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday from 12 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. Visit nerfedshawnee.com for more information. 

Professors discuss voting, politics from a Christian perspective

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

Politics has saturated much of today’s mainstream social media and news outlets.

It’s almost impossible to have no opinion on current issues, policies or lawmakers, but how does a Christian decide on these things?

Five OBU faculty gathered in Upper GC last Tuesday for a “Let’s Talk” discussion about this very question: not what stance to take on political topics, but how Christians should go about deciding these things.

Maliek Blade, assistant dean of students: diversity/multicultural, Scot Loyd, assistant professor of communication arts, Alan Bandy, Rowena R. Strickland Associate Professor of New Testament and Greek, Nicole Johnson, assistant professor of nursing, and Christopher McMillion, assistant professor of political science, answered questions prompted by SGA president Clayton Myers about Christians and politics. After the panelists gave their thoughts, a discussion time afforded students the opportunity to express their opinions in small groups.

The first question, “Should Christians be involved in politics?” spurred conversation on voting.

Loyd said we should exercise our freedom to vote. We shouldn’t take our freedom for granted, he said.

Arielle Chastain, a junior elementary education major, who attended the “Let’s Talk” event, said she agreed with Loyd. She said Chris-tians should look at voting as an obligation.

“White men were the only ones who could vote for a long time,” she said. “People worked their behinds off to make it so women, black people and minorities have the right to vote. We shouldn’t take advantage of that.”

Blade said he had a different opinion. It’s up to a person whether or not they want to be involved in politics that way, he said.

“I would say there is not any Biblical mandate that you should vote in the presidential election,” he said. “There might be some social pressure, but no Biblical command.”

Blade said many people look at elections as picking the lesser of two evils. No sin is lesser or greater than another, and the Bible says pick no evil.

McMillion added to Blade’s comment, saying if someone doesn’t vote because they don’t want to pick the lesser of two evils, they should get involved elsewhere politically.

“There’s a responsibility to ask yourself, ‘how else can I get involved?’ and in doing so, hopefully, create a situation where Christians have better options.”

The panel also brought up political parties.

Bandy said “love your neighbor” and “seek first the Kingdom of God” supersedes political parties.

“For us to align with a party is inherently flawed. It hinders our evangelism if we’re too closely aligned,” he said. “The Gospel transcends any human government.”

Later, Johnson touched on healthcare. She said she’s fortunate enough to afford healthcare, but she understands not everyone has that ability.

“As Christians, we should be concerned about that,” she said.“It was with Christ that we actually saw people receive care regardless of race, background or class.”

She said that’s the example Christians should set. Healthcare shouldn’t be solely a governmental issue, she said.

“With healthcare, it’s not always about business,” she said about when money comes into play. “Unfortunately, money sometimes dictates your access, and we have to figure out how to fix that.”

Another social issue talked about was immigration.

“One of the things I find most disturbing is the dehumanization of people,” Bandy said.

He said he understands it’s a complex issue, but regardless of the stance on a solution, a mere “keep them out” is unbiblical.

“I don’t care what country you come from, what language you speak, you’re a human being. Human beings are a priority.”

Professor to speak at TedX Forum March 26

By Jacob Factor, News Editor

TED (Technology, Entertainment and Design) has become a worldwide cultural phenomenon of thought-provoking conferences, “Talks,” and community events, “to make great ideas accessible and spark conversation.”
TED is global, but even here at OBU, people are helping advance their mission.
Scot Loyd, assistant professor of communication arts, will be speaking at a TEDx event at the University of Arkansas, Monticello March 26.
Independently organized by community leaders, TEDx events include live speakers and pre-recorded TED Talks.
TEDx “brings the spirit of TED’s mission of ideas worth spreading to local communities around the globe,” according to their website.
The event Loyd is speaking at, titled “Planting Roots, Going Higher,” features nine different speakers, who will be covering different topics throughout the evening.
Other speakers are:
• Former WWE U.S. Champion Hassan “MVP” Assad
• Comedian Ky Krebs
• AR State Representative Mark Lowery
• Attorney Deanna Wallace
• UAM Student Alyssa Hooks
• Professor Craig Olsen
• Historian Roy “Trae” Wisecarver
• Professor Clint Young
Topics include former prisoner bias from Assad, comedy and political correctness from Krebs, the importance of inviting others in from Loyd, and how an idea becomes a law from Lowery, according to their Twitter.
The event at UAM is organized by Adam Key, who, according to the event website, “is a Ph.D. student in the Texas A&M Department of Communication and the Speech Instructor and Debate Coach at Lee College – Huntsville Center, the oldest and largest prison college program in Texas.”
The event is free to attend, but you can register for the event at eventbrite.com